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What NOT to ask while taking user Feedback?

When you take user feedback, there are three things you shouldn't do. Ask users to rate on a 1-10 scale of how optimistic they are about the outcome. Ask how many errors they have seen or will see in the future. And don’t ask users for their opinion about a product or service - that is your competition's job and they are paid to create opinions. While looking through user feedback, some things you should NOT do.

  • When users give you feedback, ask about benefits and avoid questions such as “On a scale of 1-10, how optimistic are you that the new product will be a success?” Instead, ask “What is your biggest benefit from using our service?” or “In which area are we doing well?”
  • Never ask users to rate their optimism on a scale of 1 to 10. It is far too general and open-ended.
  • If you’re going to ask for user feedback, skip boring rating scales and focus on open-ended questions that let users talk about specifics.
  • Asking users to rate the natural design of an interface, their anger at a bug in your software or how positive they feel about a competitor’s system are all examples of leading questions–meaning you don't want [the user] to answer what you think; you want them just to be honest.
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Sometimes it's difficult to know what to say or what's appropriate to ask in order to get the feedback you need. Asking """"what would you do differently?"""" is usually a good approach. But many of us don't know enough information about a company or product to be able to evaluate its strengths and weaknesses in an objective way. It's often best to combine information gathered from multiple sources — customer surveys, de-identified user feedback, formal interviews — in order to get a more complete picture of how customers feel about a product or service.

Don't make a user be a critic. Don't make them rate it on a scale or rate how many errors they have seen. Don't make them tell you whether or not they like it. Ask users what they are doing in your product and not to compare it with something else.

You want to find out what users think of your product or service, and how you can make things better. There are some specific ways to ask users for their feedback that will help you get the information you really need.

  • Don’t ask users to rate their optimism levels related to specific outcomes - that is a measurement of positivity and has nothing to do with your product.
  • Measuring error rates, number of glitches, or any errors in perception is totally irrelevant to measuring user. You want to find out what users think of your product or service, and how you can make things better. There are some specific ways to ask users for their feedback that will help you get the information you really need.

Don’t drive blind. You need to see which users are loving your product and why. You should ask them how they feel about your product or service, and find ways to meet their needs.